authors

Imre Keseru

Imre Keseru

Dr Imre Keseru is an assistant professor and team leader for urban mobility at the MOBI Mobility, Logistics and Automotive Technology Research Centre at the Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB). In his previous positions, he developed policies for international transport at the Hungarian Ministry of Transport and was deputy head of unit at the Institute for Transport Sciences in Budapest.  His main research themes include participatory evaluation of urban mobility projects, stakeholder involvement in transport planning, co-creation for mobility, analysis of travel time use and scenario building for urban mobility. He has extensive experience in EU-funded research projects. He has recently been involved in the participatory evaluation of future scenarios for mobility and transport in Europe (Mobility4EU project) and he is coordinating the Learning Loops in the Public Realm (LOOPER) project to develop a co-creation platform for urban issues. He is also leading the Horizon2020 project INDIMO (Inclusive Digital Mobility Solutions) and coordinates the contribution of MOBI to the SPROUT (Sustainable Policy Response to Urban Mobility Transitions) project.

Abstract

INCLUSIVE DIGITAL MOBILITY – NOT ONLY FOR THE YOUNG, WEALTHY AND TECH-SAVVY!

Digital mobility: is it only for the young, wealthy and tech-savvy? Let’s explore together how we can make digital mobility more accessible and inclusive for all parts of society. This challenge session will explore user requirements and the needs of policy makers to assess the inclusiveness of new mobility solutions. Participants will evaluate the accessibility and inclusiveness of route planners, booking systems and shared mobility apps.

DEVELOPING CITY SCENARIOS FOR URBAN MOBILITY TRANSITION: THE SPROUT PROJECT

The rapidly changing urban mobility environment – characterized by emerging business models, new technologies, and disruptive innovations – represents a considerable challenge for urban mobility policy making. Previously tested urban mobility policy responses turned out not to be adequate to address the transition underway and to address today´s societal challenges and issues related to citizens’ everyday lives.